<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=439793516377641&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

CATEGORY ARCHIVES: botnets

New Gafgyt Botnet TOR Variant Targets D-Link and IoT Devices

The Gafgyt IoT botnet has been around for 7 years already, boasting many different variants over time. Also known as BASHLITE, this botnet has become notorious for launching DDoS attacks, making it almost as well-known as famous botnets such as Mirai in recent years. In 2018, two Gafgyt variants were detected, targeting Apache Struts and SonicWall vulnerabilities. Over the next year, Gafgyt started targeting vulnerable internet of things devices, wreaking havoc on gaming servers all over the world.

Read More

Share this:

ThreatSTOP's Hottest Content of the Year

Wondering what our readers were most interested in over the past year? Wonder no more! We've rounded up our most read articles of the year to save you time. Wrapping up the worldwide roller coaster that was 2020, we wish we were feeling a little more nostalgic. Covid-19 came in like a tornado and changed up our daily lives as we knew them. The security industry, accordingly, also had to change mindsets and processes to adjust to a new, distributed-access-focused reality.

The Best, according to you:

Read More

Share this:

BOTNETS 101: INFAMOUS BOTNETS OF THE 21ST CENTURY

A botnet is a distributed network consisting of many compromised internet-connected devices, which are controlled by a centralized botmaster, and are utilized to perform synchronized tasks. Each infected machine is called a bot, and together their power is used to carry out various attacks. Botnets are usually created via malware infections, which gain persistence on the machines and “recruit” them to the botnet. Some of these malware variants can even self-propagate through networks, infecting many devices via one network entry point. The bandwidth amount “taken” from each bot is relatively small, so that the victim will not realize that their device is being exploited, but when thousands or even millions of machines are simultaneously instructed to perform a joint, targeted attack, the damage can be immense.

Although we are used to thinking of botnets as a collection of computers, these networks can be comprised of various types of devices – personal computers, laptops, mobile devices, smart watches, security cameras, and smart house appliances.

Our Security Research Team has created a timeline of the  most famous, dangerous and costly botnets of the century. Download the timeline here, or check it out at the bottom of this post.
Read More

Share this:

Infographic: The Most Infamous Botnets of the 21st Century

Botnets are a unique type of threat. The colossal power that networks of millions of compromised computers can reach allows botnets to do a lot of damage, from generating and stealing large sums of money to deploying dangerous attacks. Last year saw a 71.5% increase in botnets as opposed to 2018, further showing that botnets are a worthwhile business for attackers, and a prevalent threat to watch out for.

These malicious networks have been around since the very end of the 90’s, rapidly evolving and becoming more advanced, year by year. Our new infographic examines the most prevalent, well-known botnets from the beginning of the century up until today, shedding light on the diverse landscape and evolution of this fascinating threat.

Read More

Share this:

What Is a Botnet? Common Architecture, Purpose & Attack Types

What Is a Botnet?

A botnet is a distributed network consisting of many compromised internet-connected devices, which are controlled by a centralized botmaster, and are utilized to perform synchronized tasks. Each infected machine is called a bot, and together their power is used to carry out various attacks. Botnets are usually created via malware infections, which gain persistence on the machines and “recruit” them to the botnet. Some of these malware variants can even self-propagate through networks, infecting many devices via one network entry point. The bandwidth amount “taken” from each bot is relatively small, so that the victim will not realize that their device is being exploited, but when thousands or even millions of machines are simultaneously instructed to perform a joint, targeted attack, the damage can be immense.

Although we are used to thinking of botnets as a collection of computers, these networks can be comprised of various types of devices – personal computers, laptops, mobile devices, smart watches, security cameras, and smart house appliances.

Read More

Share this:

Think Mirai is Gone? Think Again. It’s Alive & Active. Here's What You Need to Know.

Between March 2 - 5, we detected a significant increase in scanning activities over Tenet ports via the target, ''NoThink! Telnet HoneyPot – IPs," provided by NoThink. To put this in perspective, the magnitude includes an increase of 4,000 IPs to about 130,000 IPs that were a part of the scanning on telnet ports, as presented in Figure 1 below.

Read More

Share this:

Torii: The New IoT Botnet You Might Need to Start Worrying About

An extremely sophisticated IoT botnet has recently been discovered and dubbed “Torii.” One of Torii malware’s many advanced capabilities is running on just about every type of smartphone, computer and tablet, with over 100 malware variants supporting over 15 different architectures.

Read More

Share this:

Your favorite Android games, now part of the latest botnet...

That link your friend just sent you for a free version of Angry Birds? I wouldn't click it. But many have and are now sending out enough SMS messages to make any spammer applaud.

Read More

Share this:

Nitol Takedown: How ThreatSTOP can help identify affected machines.

There's a lot of noise out there about "Nitol" and the takedown. What, exactly, does that mean to you?

Read More

Share this:

With Bots Behind the Attack...EVERYONE is a Target

BloombergTV did a recent segment that was quite interesting with Imperva's CEO, Shlomo Kramer. Kramer speaks of the shift in malicious activity across the internet, with bots now leading the charge as opposed to humans with malicious intent.

Read More

Share this:

ARCHIVES

see all

OTHER THREATSTOP OUTLETS

  1. ThreatSTOP on YouTube
  2. ThreatSTOP on Twitter